Edward Enninful Seeing More Young Black People Getting Involved in Fashion

Fashion is perhaps the most openly racist industry in the world today -- examples A, B and C...and D, E, and F-- but W's new fashion and style editor, Edward Enninful hopes that we'll all soon be "one global fashion industry." Speaking with the Huffington Post, Enninful notes that while there are "still very few black people," the American fashion industry has reassessed its approach to fashion. And who else do we have to thank but that certified brick house of a Fierce Lady, Michelle Obama: "You know, for one of the most influential women in the country to be black. I know that meant a great deal to a lot of black people in the fashion industry. And also now we have Twitter, we have the internet, and I've seen so many young black people who are involved in fashion. They're making their own clothes, they're styling, they're taking photographs, and I guess the future generation to come, they're all racing to become one global fashion industry. That's what I hope, anyway." Enninful goes on to describe working with Franca Sozzani on the now legendary "Black Issue" of Vogue Italia, claiming the editix "put her money where her mouth is": "She continued to feature black models, she continued to feature different body types or body shapes. She continued to challenge the norm, which is the question that we've been talking about, and I feel that's what we want to take from W as well. We want to make everybody a part of the after-party." It's kind of ridiculous that it's 2011 and we're still discussing racism at all, let alone racism in an industry as forward-thinking and revolutionary as fashion. Andrej Pejic just did double duty in mens and womenswear during São Paulo Fashion Week, after all. Luckily there are people like Ed Enninful leading the way towards a new ethnically rich and diverse fashion frontier. [HuffPo]